Pruning Pepper Plants

To prune or not to prune your pepper plants – decisions, decisions!  I did some pruning experiments over the past month, and I do believe that it can definitely help out a lanky plant.

How about some before and after photos, so you can see what I mean?

Before – Introducing Havsau (a.k.a. Mr. Wimpy)

Havasau Before First Pruning 03/07/2016

Havsau Before First Pruning 03/07/2016

I bought  my Havsau pepper plant at Home Depot or Lowes — I forget which.  It looked reasonable, or so I thought.  But after being in the ground for a few weeks and doing nothing, I figured I’d try a pruning to see if I could jump-start things.

To the right is a photo of the plant on March 3.  It doesn’t look so wimpy in the photo, but if you had seen it in person, you would have agreed that the name fit!

The leaves were light green — not the deeper green that I would like.  The stem was also pretty weak.  Many of my other plants were flowering and even setting fruit — but not Havsau.

I am growing it in a 5-gallon container, like many of my other pepper plants, and it has a nice rich and loose soil – plenty of compost, too.  It just didn’t seem to really catch on like my other peppers.

Time for a Haircut!

The decision I had to make was – how much to cut off?  Should it be just a little, or should I go radical?

Havsau After First Pruning, 03/07/2016

Havsau After First Pruning, 03/07/2016

You might be able to tell from the photo to the left — I decided to go somewhat on the radical side.  There were four big leaves left, along with a small leaf or two.

Yes, it did look sad — even sadder than before.  I started second-guessing myself, if I had perhaps gone too far?

I decided to keep it so that it only got about 5 hours of sun a day for the first few days, instead of its usual 8 hours.  I didn’t want it to get too terribly shocked at first.

Now the theory is that by cutting back the growing tip (the main stem), it forces the plant to bush out and develop multiple stems.

The multiple stems would allow the plant to bush out and be stockier.  It would also provide for additional points to develop fruits.  I haven’t grown this pepper before — I don’t know if I will like the resulting peppers or not — but if not, I have plenty of neighbors who wouldn’t mind some.

Plus…I just think a stocky plant is a prettier plant.

Three Weeks Later – No More Mr. Wimpy!

Havsau Pepper 04/01/2016

Havsau Pepper 04/01/2016

I took this photo about three weeks later.  No more wimpy plant!  Instead, it’s growing like no tomorrow.

And although you can’t see it from this angle, the plant is developing all kinds of buds.  Within a week, I think it will be flower city on this plant.  I’ll be taking more photos over the next few weeks, to keep track of its growth, flowering and fruiting.

Any More Plants Getting Pruned?

You might be wondering if I tried this on any other plants — that maybe this was just a lucky accident?

I had a lot of other plants with flowers and fruits, except for one – Cowhorn.  So I snipped it back as well.  It’s definitely gotten stockier, but hasn’t had the explosion growth that Havsau experienced.  On the other hand, the container or location might have something to do with that — the Big Bertha plant in the container with it (they share a 20-gallon container) is also growing slowly.

About 10 days ago, my Shishito pepper was looking anemic and had stopped flowering.  Sooooooo, I picked off all the peppers (there weren’t many) and snipped it back, although not radically.  And today I have flowers and lots of little peppers!

Next up is one of my Orange Bell peppers.  It has a nice-sized pepper on it, which I will cut off for dinner tonight.  And that means tomorrow it’s going to get a trim.  The plant is single-stemmed and isn’t flowering, so between taking off the pepper and giving it a snip, I should see some action in the next couple of weeks.

 

2 Responses to Pruning Pepper Plants

  • Matew says:

    Hi,,question,,after pruning the plant takes a Y shape but do you support that sidebranches you got, and second questions..how do you prune peppers after this pruning ??

    Thanks

  • Gail says:

    Hi, and thanks for the question. No, I didn’t support the big leaves) at all right after the pruning. I also have not had to support the “Y” branching that has happened since the plant has grown up and out. Now, I may have to put in some support as the peppers grow larger (I already have a bunch), if they start to weigh down the branches – but so far I am good.

    I’m not quite sure what you mean by prune peppers after this pruning, so I’ll answer a couple of different ways.

    First, I don’t take off the flowers or peppers that form after the initial pruning – I let them grow, and I pick the peppers like I normally would.

    Second, would I prune the plant even more — prune the pruning, so to speak? Yes, if the plant was getting leggy, I would prune back some of the legginess. I would not cut it way back to the original fork though.

    My Havsau plant is growing very fast, so I may have to do some additional pruning to control it. If I do, I’ll take some photos or a video of the process.

    Hope this has helped!

    Gail

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