peter pepper

Germinating Pepper Seeds, Update

It’s been just over a week since I planted my latest batch of pepper seeds, both hot and sweet. So what’s sprouting already?

And the Winner Is…

Corno di Toro, a sweet pepper, was first out of the gate at 5 days. However, of the two seeds I’ve planted, only one has shown up yet. On the other hand, I planted two different strains (confused yet?). At any rate, the red Corno di Toro is the clear winner.

Jalapeno M was the second to sprout at 6 days, with both seeds coming on up. Jalapeno M was closely followed by Cambuci Hot, about a half day behind.

The next two sprouted at nearly the same time — Nardello Sweet and [nmslink:mini belle pepper seed, Mini Belle].

And finally this morning — Mustard Habanero.  Wow, a super-hot pepper in 7.5 days — amazing.

I’m Waiting On

Some “hotties” — Hot-Banero, Peter Pepper and Bhut Jolokia.  Also lagging are two more jalapenos — Jaloro and Tam Jalapeno.  Brazillian Rainbow is also nowhere to be seen yet.  I know — patience!  And considering 10 to 21 days is the usual for hot chile peppers, it’s great that some have already shown their faces (er, leaves).  Yes, the seed germination mat I talked about does work well, shaving days off the sprouting.

Thinking About a Transplant

Purira pepper (quite hot) is growing very strong and looks like it will need its final transplant before going outside to harden off for the garden in the next few days.  Seeing as I did its first transplant early last week, this one appears to be a winner!

Other pepper seeds that need their final transplants before hardening off include Redskin, Anconcagua and the last of the sweet banana peppers.  For Sweet Pickle I just did its first transplant on Saturday, and it appears that it will need its second transplant this weekend — wow, that was fast!

More Seeds?

I think I’ll take a short break, since I have at least 20 pepper plants at the moment, not counting the ones that are just now sprouting.  Come the middle of April, it will be time to start thinking about my late Summer wave.  I’m planning on the following peppers for then:  Datil, Tennessee Teardrop, Ring of Fire, Yellow Cayenne and [nmslink:scotch bonnet pepper seeds, Scotch Bonnet].  On the cooler side it will be more Sweet Banana, along with Anconcagua and probably Nardello Sweet.  Perhaps Mini Belle again, if small bell peppers work well for me.

Have You Planted Your Seeds Yet?

I know, it’s been a cold winter, and for many of you, putting pepper plants into the garden is many months away.  But for you folks in zones 8, 9 and 10 — it’s pepper “prime time”.  Get planting!

P.S. — it’s a few hours later and both my Corno di Toro, both Cambuci and both Mustard Habaneros are up. Even Peter Pepper is starting to break through! What a difference a few hours can make. :)

Chile Pepper Seeds

It’s been quite cool here in South Florida during January, and now we’re set to get more near-freezing weather this week — it doesn’t bode well for chile peppers!  I’ve got one out in the garden already — Thai Hot — but none of my other chile seeds (except for Pretty Purple Pepper) have germinated.  My sweet peppers, on the other hand, have pretty much all germinated fine.

Hmm.

The Need for Heat

Thinking that warmth may be the issue (it’s been awfully cool inside the house as well), I decided to spring for a new [nmslink:seedling heat, seed germination heating pad].  If you’re not familiar with them, they provide a gentle heat to the bottom of the seed tray.  Think of these as heating pads for seeds!

Note:  you cannot use a regular “people” heating pad to warm your seeds — they are not designed to operate 24/7 and the seed germination pads are.  If you use a regular heating pad, you risk starting a fire (or at the very least developing hot spots and give too much heat to the little seeds).

Now my new one is about 20″ x 10″ in size, and I can put two of my 8″ x 8″ trays on it with room to spare.  I generally like only only do smaller trays, in cycles.  That way, while one tray is sprouted and enjoying the grow lights, I can be starting another set.

Today’s Chile Pepper Seeds

Some of today’s seeds are new (I just bought them recently) and some are from 10 years ago — treasured seeds that I can’t help but try and grow again.

The new seeds are:  Cambuci Hot, Jalapeno M, [nmslink:mustard habanero seed, Mustard Habanero], [nmslink:peter pepper seed, Peter Pepper] and [nmslink:bhut jolokia, Bhut Jolokia].

The older seeds are:  Tam Jalapeno, Jaloro, Hot-Banero and Brazillian Rainbow.  The last two especially, since they were both from saved seed in my garden.  Hot-Banero was the absolute hottest pepper I have ever grown and Brazillian Rainbow is rare.  I’d love to see how my Hot-Banero stacks up against Mustard Habanero and Bhut Jolokia!

Unfortunately, it’s going to be awhile before I really can expect any “action” from my plantings.  Chile seeds seem to take quite a bit longer than sweet peppers, so I’m thinking it will be around Valentine’s Day before I see the first of the chiles popping their heads above ground.

Germinating pepper seeds isn’t really hard, except for the waiting part.  But given my weather of late, I’d have to wait to plant them even if they were already sprouted and grown enough.